30th Mar2020

‘100 Humans’ Review (Netflix)

by Rhys Payne

100-humans-art

100 Humans is a new Netflix Original show that aims to investigate some of the strangest questions to ever be asked on television by putting 100 people into certain activities and games to test these wild and crazy ideas – some of which are actually created by the test subjects!

The series opens with an explanation of the show – an explanation which gauged my interest as to me it’s a super interesting concept for a show. The first experiment was a great way to start as they had the titular 100 Humans in a grid and asked them if they believed themselves to be in the top 50% of the most attractive people in the grid… Now  you would expect 50 people to say they are and 50 to say they are not but this was not the case. This is a common thing and helps adds to the vibe of the series. Instead of just demonstrating things that are true this show is all about exploration and experimentation and explores more than the idea of just “true and false”, which is fantastic to see. Two of the experiments that I found particularly interesting  included a look into the effects attractiveness has on criminal sentences and also the idea of unconscious bias which had a shocking experiment involving a shooting range. Obviously, I won’t tell you the results of these two as you need to watch it for yourself!

The way they went about doing these experiments was also extremely interesting as sometimes they were sometimes disguised as something else. There were tests about inflating a balloon that was pitched as a challenge and instead it was assessing risk avoidance between men and women; or when 100 Humans were told to get prepared for a road trip, which unknowingly tested which gender takes longer to get ready. Having a show that reflected a realistic environment in a natural setting is really fantastic for both entertainment value and reliability/scientific-based perspective. The results or findings from his show are as realistic as possible and are based in actual science. They really pushed this idea during interviews with experts in the specific field they were exploring, which really helped up the “intelligence” of the show; but also as the interviews were somewhat comical at times it helped to keep the viewers entertained and helped break up the experiments – which was beneficial to the audience as some of the experiment set-ups were extremely slow and sometimes it affected the whole overall pace.

100 Humans is a show that I personally would love to be involved with if there is another series, as not only do they explore some very interesting concepts with unique and exciting experiment but also it looked as if all the participants were having a really enjoyable time during the final episode where they talked about and showed highlights from their time together. One of the many great things about this show is that each episode is the same 100 Humans which really helps with consistency for the audience.

Overall 100 Humans is a very interesting and education show that carefully treads the line between science and comedy. It was clear that everyone involved enjoyed what they were doing and had a real passion in these experiments which radiated through the science to the viewers at home. I really hope more seasons are developed so I can have a chance to get involved!

**** 4/5

100 Humans is available on Netflix now.

Off

Comments are closed.