22nd Jun2017

‘Flintstones #12′ Review

by Dan Clark

Written by Mark Russell | Art by Steve Pugh | Published by DC Comics

the-flintstones-12

It is safe to say that The Flintstones will go down as one of the biggest pleasant surprises in the history of comics. When the first promo images were released for this along with the other Hanna Barbera series the majority of the world scoffed at the very idea of this project. While the other series like Scooby Doo Apocalypse have left a lot to be desired, Mark Russell and Steve Pugh’s Flintstones has been one of the best comics since its debut. It is a series that will only grow in notoriety as more people learn about its brilliance.

Issue twelve is a bittersweet moment as it marks the end of this fantastic book. Not wanting over extend this idea is admirable, but still, it is hard to let something so consistently good go. In reality the sharp social and political commentary that makes The Flintstones what it is could only last so long. Rarely do comics or really any form of entertainment end before there is a sharp dip in quality. Part of being a great creator is knowing when to move on to something new.

This issue works as a wrap-up of some of the major stories that have been building during these past twelve issues. A testament to the power of this series is how it crafted one of the most fulfilling narratives around a bowling ball and his relationship with a vacuum cleaner. Objects that were just cheap gags in the original cartoon where the heart and soul of this series, which ties into one of the biggest surprises of this last installment. For a series that was mighty critical of the human race and our society, this had a much more upbeat and optimistic outlook.

During the issue The Great Gazoo is giving his assessment on humanity and its downfalls but why there is reason to be hopeful. Within that framework we see Bam Bam and Pebbles attempting to better understand the conflict between science and religion. The result is one of the best explanation for the need for religion I have read. One that is not critical nor ignorant to its problems. The Church of Gerald has been a consistent source of humor but here it became something more.

Steve Pugh also needs to be praised for his work. No one else could have made this book except for him. That look that many people criticized at first was key in making the tone perfect. If this looked too cartoony it would not nearly be as effective and if it was too realistic it the irony would be absent. I truly hope these two work on so much more in the future.

If you are still hesitant to read this series get over that as quickly as possible. Go back to issue one and get ready to experience twelve issues of genius. This final issue may not be the best one so far but it is a fitting end to a special book. I can safely say we will never see a book like this ever again.

*****½  4.5/5

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